Engine Turning

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  • Engine Turning - Martin Matthews built a Pole Lathe in his garden for this shot
  • Engine Turning - William Hartley invented this Geometric Chuck
  • Engine Turning - an amazing variety of patterns can be achieved with the various machines
  • Engine Turning - woodland scene
  • Engine Turning - security printing
  • Engine Turning - cam machine
  • Engine Turning - the Brocade engine, where different patterned tubes can be added to the machine
  • Engine Turning - Bow lathe

Engine Turning

£22.50 £12.00

5 out of 5 based on 3 customer ratings
(3 customer reviews)

Martin Matthews was known internationally as one of our most important Horologists. His gentle manner and sense of humour come through as he explains the progression of engine turning, based on his research and from his own expertise in using antique tools. He shows in great detail, the development of the lathe from Antiquity to the computer age, from decorated wooden items to the finely cut designs as seen under enamel and security printing on postage stamps & banknotes. Supported by the Society of Ornamental Turners.

Watch Trailer 2 mins 55 secs. Full DVD 45 mins.

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Product Description

Length: 45 mins.

Produced: 2006.

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Additional Information

Video Format

NTSC (North America), PAL

3 reviews for Engine Turning

  1. 5 out of 5

    :

    The Society of Ornamental Turners – Bulletin No. 115

    DVD/Video Review by Michael Windsor

    I was very pleased and excited when, some months ago, I was informed that Martin Matthews was going to make another DVD/Video. Having watched his first video, Four Generations of Watchcase Making, which was an excellent production, I naturally thought it was going to be further aspects of watchcase manufacture and patterning.

    So I was surprised and delighted when I realised that the content of this latest production was on “ Patterning Machines ”. I quickly realised that this was a unique record for future generations showing such a huge variety of different machines from all over the country.

    On viewing this DVD for the first time you are, at the beginning, pulled up sharp by the disjointed sound track. But this is intended to get you out of the comfort zone, brain in gear and into analytical mode.

    Martin very quickly puts the viewer at ease with his clear, gentle, informative commentary, which is accompanied by a visual feast of machines and equipment. These range from basic wood turning between centres, in the open air using the branch of a tree as a return power to drive the engine/lathe, to a highly sophisticated Michael Kampf geometric security engraving machine. ( Those early wood turners must have had thighs like tree trunks ).

    I have now watched the DVD several times with pen and paper at the ready to make notes but have become so engrossed each time that I ended up with a blank piece of paper. This is really a tribute to the way Martin has been able to produce a script from his vast knowledge and put it into sections which are informative, exciting and will make sense to viewers even if they only have a little knowledge of the subject.

    The whole production is enhanced by Barbara Darby’s masterly skill in capturing the very important aspects of the different individual machines and the variety of equipment used. She has an in-depth understanding of the subject and is therefore able to show the intricacies of these fabulous machines, illuminating hidden cogs and levers with the use of clever camera angles.

    They spend some time exploring Martin’s own machines before moving onto the Society’s Rose Engine and all its equipment. Especially the many different types of chucks like the pencil and the weird looking brass independent four-jaw branch chuck*. We then visit the workshop of Jeremy Soulsby and see a 300 year old rare wooden rose engine with brass rosettes. It demonstrates very clearly the body of knowledge that was known at that time. Also it shows the skill of how, with only basic tooling, those magnificent craftsmen were able to build such complicated machines and get them to work and produce on them wonderful ornamentally turned objects.

    Whilst still on the subject of rose engines, we were able to see the exquisite beauty and remarkable engineering ability with which Jeremy and Fred Armbruster made their own rose engines.

    Martin then spoke to our President of the Society, John Edwards, who drew our attention to some of the history of straight- line and rose engines from illustrations by Moxon and Bergeron. John also efficiently demonstrated the principles of how the rare rose chuck worked.

    We could see the infinite variety of patterns generated from the Hartley chuck and an Ibbetson geometric chuck. These are simply amazing, as were Alabone’s coloured patterns.

    We then moved onto Nick Edwards’ security engraving machines. The cabinet, which comes with this machine, contains racks and racks of change wheel gears and the number of designs for the use of different combinations of wheels must run into tens of thousands. It crossed my mind that Nick might like to produce one of each pattern, maybe for the next AGM. ( Also on show was the Nick-type, designer, oily looking, multi-coloured tee shirt – a must for every self-respecting ornamental turner. )

    Lastly, we were privileged to see the commercial workshop of Pledge and Aldworth. Steve Keen showed us different types of machines used, and demonstrated on a British, made in Birmingham, Plant 14” straight-line engine ( note the important use of stops). This machine is probably the best straight-line engine ever produced. Sadly the brocading machine was not working but we did have sight of the computer operated multi-chucked straight-line engine working. Hence the strange sounds at the beginning of the DVD.

    This is a wonderful information packed DVD. A must in the library of every ornamental turner.

    I hope we can look forward to the next production soon!

    * Featured in Bulletin # 58, pages 151-152 – Ed.

  2. 5 out of 5

    :

    Martin has been able to produce a script from his vast knowledge and put it into sections which are informative, exciting and will make sense to viewers.

  3. 5 out of 5

    :

    Barbara Darby’s masterly skill in capturing the very important aspects of the different individual machines and the variety of equipment used. She has an in-depth understanding of the subject and is therefore able to show the intricacies of these fabulous machines, illuminating hidden cogs and levers with the use of clever camera angles.

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